PhotoSensitive

We are forever grateful to the talented photographers who have given their time, energy and creativity to PhotoSensitive. All accomplished artists in their own right, each photographer has a generosity of spirit and a sensibility that allows them to see life. With each assignment, the photographers take on the responsibility of entering into people's lives, seeing and learning, and becoming more human.

Here, you will find details of our photographer friends, their PhotoSensitive work and links to their own websites. These pages are dedicated to those talented individuals who have given freely their time and energy to help us realize our visions. Thank you.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
James Forsyth
PROJECTS
James Forsyth created an extensive pictorial archive of the fast-vanishing working-class community in Scotswood Road, Newcastle upon Tyne, in the 1950s and 1960s. By the mid-1950s Scotswood Road had been designated a slum and was marked for demolition and clearance. Buildings and streets were gradually being knocked down as part of the redevelopment of the West end of the city set in train by T. Dan Smith, the powerful leader of the city council in the 1960s. Unlike other photographers, such as Henri Cartier-Bresson, who were renowned for their ability to capture street life on camera, Forsyth was seen by the denizens of Scotswood Road as an insider. They dropped their guard to pose for him, and treasured the prints he subsequently sold them: for many of them, a Forsyth photograph was the only image of themselves they would ever possess. One Scotswood Road matron carried Forsyth’s two-and-a-quarter inch print of herself as a child in every handbag she owned. The result of his work was a set of photographs infused with a rare sense of intimacy that often eluded more sophisticated photographers. James Forsyth was born on August 15, 1913. He died on July 11, 2009, aged 95.