PhotoSensitive
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AIDS: Picture Change
PhotoSensitive's project, AIDS: Picture change, an international project led by CARE Canada began in 2005. CARE had asked Lucas Robinson, 27, to write a proposal to CIDA (Canadian International Development Agency) for funding. The original goal of the project was to show what Canadians were doing in Africa to care for those living with HIV/AIDS. When Care received CIDA funding, the project expanded to 7 agencies, 8 photographers and 5 countries. The PhotoSensitive photographers were sent to Kenya, Mozambique, Ethiopia, India and Cambodia to document people living with HIV/AIDS. Capturing those images was, of course, the collective work of the photographers in the field and Lucas Robinson remembers first going with Patti Gower and Benjamin Rondel into Kenya, then with Andy Clark, Peter Bregg and Steve Simon into Mozambique, and then taking Dick Loek, Andrew Stawicki and Tony Hauser into India and Cambodia, and Steve Simon into Ethiopia. He recalls each photographer was totally engaged, despite lots of challenges.
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Beyond the Wave
Beyond the Wave was a project that started when PhotoSensitive founder, Andrew Stawicki wanted to photograph the survivors of the Asian tsunami of 2004 one year later in 2005. Andrew Stawicki spoke with David Toycen, the CEO and president of World Vision Canada along with CARE Canada, who offered advice and financial support to make the project happen. Both agencies also went on to help with the PhotoSensitive project, AIDS: Picture Change. In the project, PhotoSensitive brings global issues like poverty in Aceh, Indonesia, home to people in places like Toronto. World Vision appreciates the work of these talented photographers, because what they do is actually part of the solution. One of the founding photographers of PhotoSensitive, Stan Behal, was sent to see life-beyond-the-wave in some coastal communities of Sri Lanka. Beyond the Wave left Tony Hauser thinking about why PhotoSensitive photographers go to such lengths to tell a story, often one people might not want to hear.
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Braille = Equality
Braille = Equality was a project done by PhotoSensitive in partnership with Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB). The CNIB took the exhibition across Canada. Ecluid Herle, the founder of the World Braille Foundation and past president of CNIB says that many people have seen Braille = Equality more than once and not just in Canada. Braille = Equality has also been to the World Congress in January 2010 and to Melbourne in 2000. Anywhere discussing Braille literacy is a good place for these photos. Braille = Equality has been shipped from Whitehorse to cities in the United States. Last year, to celebrate Louis Braille's birth, 4,000 posters were made.
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Child Poverty
A National Disgrace - an exhibition on child poverty across Canada. PhotoSensitive’s partner, Campaign 2000. In 1989, the House of Commons had unanimously promised that by the year 2000, child poverty in Canada would be eliminated. In 1999, PhotoSensitive wanted to show that not only was child poverty not going away, it was growing. Campaign 2000, which partnered with PhotoSensitive for the project, is still working hard to eliminate child poverty. The job is far from over. The 1989 promise to eliminate child poverty by 2000 rings hollow: In 2010, one-in-ten children in Canada lives in poverty. One in every four children in First Nations communities is growing up poor. The Child Poverty exhibit drew rave reviews. It had photographs from across the country with text from June Callwood, and was showcased in Toronto, Ottawa and Vancouver.
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Hand of Hope
If PhotoSensitive was going to change the world, the United Way had countless stories that deserved attention. A unique visual presentation about the importance of the United Way in the community, A Hand of Hope portrayed the human spirit of United Way agencies and the people they touch. Fifteen different photographers were sent to fifteen different United Way agencies. And, for the very first time, they took along student photographers, kids who had shown interest in photojournalism through Kodak Canada's School Program. Exhibited in 1995, the project was the result of a partnership among PhotoSensitive, the United Way, and the Kodak Canada Schools Program. PhotoSensitive's photographers worked closely with 35 high-school students on the project, providing a special learning experience for both.
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HIV Positive
In April 2002, CARE welcomed seven members of Photosensitive to Zambia to document the HIV/AIDS crisis. In the heart of southern Africa, Zambia is one of the poorest but most peaceful nations on the continent. Sadly, the HIV/AIDS plague is deepening poverty. This was PhotoSensitive’s first NGO project outside of Canada. Seventy per cent of the world’s HIV-positive population lives in sub-Saharan Africa. PhotoSensitve connected with the former president of Zambia, Kenneth Kaunda. Kaunda’s son had died of HIV/AIDS, and the president was an impassioned supporter of educating his people about the disease.
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Inspiring Possibilities
There are over 100 Community Living associations in Ontario providing service and support to people with an intellectual disability. When the organization decided it wanted to capture the notions of independence, pride and inspiration in its work and show them to the world, it turned to PhotoSensitive. Twenty-eight PhotoSensitive photographers travelled across Ontario to document the work of 25 Community Living agencies. From Toronto to Thunder Bay, Essex County to Renfrew, these stunning black and white photographs capture images of joy and courage, daily work and eager play, independent living and assisted care. These testaments to individual triumphs inspire possibilities in all of us.
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It's In Their Eyes
PhotoSensitive's first project. A photo essay on Toronto's hungry, homeless and the triumph of the human spirit. It's in Their Eyes was exhibited in 1992. Gerard Kennedy, now an MP in Ottawa, was running the Daily Bread Food Bank in 1990 and he knew right away that the PhotoSensitive group was something extraordinary. Several photographs were taken at the Daily Bread Food Bank, which was the project's principle beneficiary. The photographs drew attention to the plight of the city's disadvantaged, their determination, camaraderie and their yearning for dignity. Photographs don't feed children the show's brochure said. We offer this in hope that one less child goes hungry tomorrow.
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Life of Water
Water, as seen by 100 Canadian photographers. David Suzuki describes water as a sacred, precious, life-giving liquid. Canada is a land rich in water with more than 18 percent of the planet's fresh water in the Great Lakes alone. We use it and abuse it. In 2004, Photosensitive invited 100 Canadian photographers to capture their vision of water, to create pictures that would connect us all. The result is an exhibition of black-and-white photographs that will force you to think about the value water brings to your life every day. Finally, a beautiful book was born and the exhibit opened to glowing reviews in Toronto in September 2005, before going on tour to five Canadian cities. Today, Andrew Stawicki says that when he looks through the Life of Water book, the photographs still make him think.
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Precious Time
A deeply moving exhibit and book documenting Toronto's world renowned Hospital for Sick Children. Precious Time was exhibited in 1994. PhotoSensitive's photographers were given unrestricted access to staff, parents, and young patients often under difficult circumstances. The photographs capture the pain and suffering, the hope and the joy that families experience at Sick Kids. They show the gritty side of the hospital, stripped of soft edges, and convey the unique story of each family as it brings its own hopes and fears to the hospital experience.
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Summer of Hope
In the summer of 2005, five PhotoSensitive photographers visited five of Ontario's northernmost and remote First Nations communities; North Caribou Lake, Kingfisher Lake, Muskrat Dam, Neskantaga and Fort Albany. They went to capture the excitement of the very first Aboriginal literacy summer camps for First Nations youth, initiated by Ontario's Lieutenant Governor James K. Bartleman. PhotoSensitive captures the essence and vital importance of the camps by showing us the faces of the children whose realities are often stark and secluded. For them, the camps offer unprecedented opportunities for learning, creativity, teamwork, and fun - all potential antidotes to the deep problems underlying the high suicide rates among Native youth in northern Ontario. Summer of Hope offers a moving portrayal of the serious, life-changing results of cultivating literacy among them.
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The Strength Within
50 years ago, the vision of United Way was as it is today - to strengthen people, their neighbourhoods and thereby the city. In 2006, as United Way celebrated their 50th anniversary, they wanted to break the $100-million mark in the upcoming campaign, so they turned again to PhotoSensitive for help. The Strength Within captures some of the people who have triumphed against adversity when given the necessary support and tools to succeed. This collection of images, taken by 24 volunteer photographers, is a celebration of the potential in all of us and the powerful impact of United Way's continuing work in neighbourhoods across Toronto.
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Them = Us
Sub-titled Photographic Journeys Across Our Cultural Boundaries, the evocative 1997 photo exhibit Them=Us featured work of PhotoSensitive's photographers as well as that of six Canadian guest photographers. The show celebrates Canadians from different backgrounds preserving their own history and culture as they live and work together in a rich national mosaic. The exhibition and its cross-Canadian tour of 40 communities was presented by the Harmony Movement, a non-profit organization dedicated to fostering mutual respect among all people and promoting diversity in Canada. The exhibit opened in October 1997, a dual opening in Vancouver and Charlottetown, and then it travelled - to shopping malls, bank buildings, museums, city halls, art galleries and libraries in seventy different communities from British Columbia to the Maritimes.
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Vibrant Communities In Focus
Celebrating the Ontario Trillium Foundation's 25th Anniversary. Shooting took place at 27 Ontario Trillium Foundation grantee organizations across Ontario. 27 photographers focused their cameras on the positive impact of Trillium grants on communities from every corner of the province. From a music school in the inner city of Toronto to kids playing sledge hockey in North Bay, from an elderly man with Alzheimer's in Lucknow to a home for young unwed mothers in Northumberland County, PhotoSensitive captured poignant and powerful moments. They met with dragon boat racers, extreme cyclists, young musicians and competitive swimmers.The exhibit launched in Toronto in November 2007, including a showing at Brookfield Place.
project videos
AIDS: Picture Change
Beyond the Wave
Braille = Equality
Child Poverty
Hand of Hope
HIV Positive
Inspiring Possibilities
It's In Their Eyes
Life of Water
Precious Time
Summer of Hope
The Strength Within
Them = Us
Vibrant Communities In Focus